Status of Caroline Town Crier

March 2014

Updated Status of Caroline Town Crier:
In June of 2011, I started the Caroline Town Crier with the hope of being able deliver information about events and other happenings in Caroline County. My plan was to get out into Caroline County (I live in Kent County) and attempt to do the same as I have with Kent County and the site Local in Kent – LocalinKent.com.

Unfortunately due to some personal issues, I have not been able follow my plans. This still remains true. Since I think there is a need for this type of site, I still want this site to happen.

When I do receive information I put it on the site. I also add whatever I come across to the Events Calendar. I am also hoping to get to some events in the county year to take some photographs.

Being that I am in Kent County, I have regularity been taking photographs at the sports event at Kent County High and their opponents including those from Caroline County. Many photos are posted at ShoreToBeFun.com/Photographs, including the 1A Boys Basketball playoff game between Colonel Richardson and Kent.

How can you help?
Let your friends and relatives (and enemies too) know about Caroline Town Crier. If you know someone who is having a event, let them know that we exist and that they should contact us so we can help publicize it. Flyers will be posted on here, free of charge.

Thank You.

So Long Summer: Chesapeake Culinary Center to host End of Summer Celebration

Chesapeake Culinary Center
September 2014

Denton, MD – Come enjoy the last days of summer with burgers and brews at the inaugural End of Summer Celebration to benefit the Chesapeake Culinary Center. The event will take place on Saturday, September 20th from 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm at the Caroline Schoolhouse, located at 512 Franklin Street in historic Denton.

Kick back and enjoy one last backyard bash before the autumnal equinox. The event will feature build-your-own burger and mac n’ cheese bars, beer and wine, a raffle, lawn games, music and more.

Tickets to the event are $25 and can be purchased by calling 410-479-2144. Reservations are suggested. Proceeds benefit the Chesapeake Culinary Center, a community-driven facility that promotes a positive culinary learning experience for students, and a professionally trained workforce for the hospitality industry.


About the Chesapeake Culinary Center
The Chesapeake Culinary Center is a grassroots, nonprofit organization committed to the betterment of the community through job training and economic development. Established in the fall of 2004, this organization provides culinary training to youth and adults and offers many student-run programs, affording practicum-learning experience. In 2014, the Chesapeake Culinary Center moved into the recently rehabilitated circa 1903 Caroline Schoolhouse. In addition to serving as the headquarters for the organization, the multi-use facility is home to the Career and Technology Center’s culinary arts classes. The center also features a Commercial Kitchen Incubator, where prospective clients, including caterers, bakers and farmers, are able to produce their culinary product in a health-approved commercial facility that provides a wealth of shared resources. For more information on the Chesapeake Culinary Center, please visit www.chesapeakeculinarycenter.com.

SHA Improves Ride Quality on Both Sides of Dover Bridge

STATE HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION

Measures will Help Strengthen Bridge Approaches until New Dover Bridge is Constructed

(August 28, 2014) — The State Highway Administration (SHA) will be applying an epoxy coating to both approaches of the Dover Bridge (MD 331) that crosses the Choptank River at the Talbot/Caroline County line. Weather permitting the work will take place the week of September 2nd, daily from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Motorists should expect a single lane closure guided by a flag person on the Dover Bridge.

Earlier this summer, SHA patched the bridge approaches with concrete. The epoxy work is the next phase of repairs to seal the road surface on the approaches to the bridge. The epoxy repairs are anticipated to cost $10,000 and will be done by Concrete General, Inc., of Gaithersburg.

If inclement weather prevents the work as originally planned, it will be rescheduled for the earliest possible weekday date that weather permits. Anyone with questions about the project may contact the SHA District 2 Office at 1-800-637-9740.

As crews strive to keep work zones safe, each driver needs to actively modify his or her driving behavior to help prevent crashes. Stay alert – look for reduced speed limits, narrow driving lanes and highway workers. Slow down and don’t follow too closely. Safer Driving. Safer Work Zones. For everyone!

63rd Denton Elementary School Harvest Festival

63rd Denton Elementary School Harvest Festival
303 Sharp Road Denton, MD.
September 27th 10am to 2pm.

Fire Truck Rides,
Hay Rides, Arts & Crafts,
Games, Moon Bounce,
Concessions, Bake Sale,
Yard Sale,
Silent Auction and Live Music

Event is Rain or Shine

Fall Nature Fun for Preschoolers at Adkins Arboretum’s Acorn Academy

Adkins Arboretum
RIDGELY, MD
August 26, 2014

Ants, butterflies, pumpkins and more! Celebrate fall with your preschooler at Adkins Arboretum’s Acorn Academy, and enjoy the fun of engaging your young child with nature. Taught by Arboretum Youth Program Coordinator Jenny Houghton, Acorn Academy is a series of eight classes for three- to five-year-olds offered on Tuesday mornings beginning Sept. 23.

Advance registration is required for these popular programs. The fee for the series of eight classes is $40 for members and $55 for non-members. Registration is also available on a per-class basis. Classes run from 10 to 11:15 a.m. and include a craft and a healthy snack. Enrollment is limited, so early registration is recommended. For more information or to register, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Programs include:

Meet Lily!
Sept. 23
Visit the Arboretum’s goat herd, led by the lovely Lily, and learn how goats are used to munch troublesome weeds. Children will make goat puppets, sample goat milk and have their pictures taken with Lily and her four-legged friends.

Ants in Your Pants
Sept. 30
Join in a wiggly “Ants in Your Pants” dance and make a fingerprint ant craft. After learning some interesting ant trivia, we’ll go on a bug hunt, try out a bug vacuum and munch “Ants on a Log” snacks.

Milkweed and Monarchs
Oct. 7
Make a wish on a fluffy milkweed seed and learn about the beautiful monarch butterflies that lay their eggs on the milkweed plant. We’ll look for milkweed pods in the meadow, make a butterfly craft and enjoy butterfly books with our snack.

Hearts a’ Bursting
Oct. 14
Follow a magenta trail of hearts a’ bursting berries through the woods as we search for signs of fall. In the classroom, we’ll make berry bracelets and snack on heart-shaped cookies.

Pumpkin Party
Oct. 21
It’s pumpkin season! We’ll get the scoop on pumpkins, visit the Arboretum’s Funshine Garden and make pumpkin shakers. Then we’ll wiggle and twist to the Pumpkin Polka!

Going Batty
Oct. 28
Bats: Terrifying vampires or cuddly Stellalunas? We’ll learn the science behind the world’s only flying mammal, experiment with echolocation and try navigating the meadow bat-style. We’ll also make batty Halloween decorations and celebrate with a holiday-themed snack and story.

Nuts for Squirrels
Nov. 4
Are you nuts for squirrels? We’ll explore the world of these furry cuties on a forest scavenger hunt and return to the classroom for acorn stories and nutty snacks. A squirrel napkin ring craft will round out this fun-filled morning.

Scouts and Maidens
Nov. 11
Who were the first people to live on the Eastern Shore? Let’s visit the Paw Paw Playground wigwams to find out! We’ll play a Native American corn game, collect sticks for a pretend campfire and craft a Native American centerpiece for the Thanksgiving table.

Photo: Adkins Arboretum Acorn Academy.

Adkins Arboretum Acorn Academy – Submitted Photo


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Learn about the Science of Resilience at Adkins Arboretum’s Fourth Annual Tent Symposium, Nature Lessons

Adkins Arboretum
RIDGELY, MD
August 19, 2014

Forests strangled by invasive vines, severe storms and frequent floods, massive wildfires in the West, loss of pollinators—it’s easy to be discouraged by the changes we see in our environment. While change is inevitable, there exists the potential to adapt to a changing environment and develop innovations that will allow us to thrive. Experience a day of education and inspiration when Adkins Arboretum hosts its fourth annual fall symposium—the Tent Symposium—on Sun., Sept. 28.

Immerse yourself in a full day at the Arboretum for Nature Lessons: Looking Toward a Resilient Future. Nature Lessons explores the science behind resilience—in plants and animals, in our climate, and in our communities. Enjoy insightful and inspiring presentations by Dr. Sylvan Kaufman, Holly H. Shimizu and Larissa Johnson. The day’s proceedings will be moderated by renowned photographer Dave Harp and environmental studies professor and legendary nature writer Tom Horton. Participants may also stroll along woodland, meadow and garden paths, visit the Native Plant Nursery and view both the seventh biennial Outdoor Sculpture Invitational exhibit and Burn Time, an event-specific installation by artists Howard and Mary McCoy.

Kaufman will present “The Resilient Environment,” a look at how biodiversity matters in establishing resilient ecosystems, and how climate change forces us to reassess traditional approaches to conservation and restoration. Kaufman consults, writes and teaches about ecology, botany and restoration topics through her business, Sylvan Green Earth Consulting. Co-author of Invasive Plants: Guide to Identification and the Impacts and Control of Common North American Species, first published in 2007, she teaches as an adjunct professor for George Washington University’s Sustainable Landscapes Program and participates on the Maryland Invasive Species Council and Maryland Invasive Plant Advisory Committee. She has worked as a researcher on invasive plant and climate change projects at Harvard University and as the curator and land manager of Adkins Arboretum.

Shimizu, a nationally recognized horticulturist with a rich background in plants and gardens, will present “The Impact of Climate Change on Gardening,” a look at the tremendous opportunities for gardeners to play an important role in plant conservation and contribute to the health of our natural environment. She served as director of the United States Botanic Garden for 14 years, during which time the Botanic Garden experienced a renaissance that included renovation of the Conservatory, completion of the National Garden and countless inspiring and innovative projects. Often recognized as a host of the popular television show Victory Garden, Shimizu has worked in gardens around the world. She has received numerous awards, including the prestigious Thomas Roland Medal for outstanding contributions to horticultural education from the Massachusetts Horticultural Society.

Johnson has dedicated her life to working with and for communities: helping people create sustainable, walkable, bikeable, healthy neighborhoods that cultivate hale and hearty children and invigorate the communities’ livelihood. She currently serves as Coordinator of Climate Change Outreach and Communication for Maryland Department of the Environment. As a leader within the climate movement in Maryland, she is working to cultivate meaningful relationships that will benefit Marylanders from the mountains to the coast. Johnson will present “Climate Change Maryland,” highlighting the accomplishments of Maryland’s Greenhouse Gas Reduction Act Plan.

Harp and Horton have collaborated on numerous projects, including three books of Harp’s photographs featuring essays by Horton in addition to Swanfall, Horton’s book for children. A lifelong Marylander, Harp operates a corporate and editorial photography business in Cambridge. He also served as photographer for the Baltimore Sun Magazine for nearly a decade. He was awarded the Andrew White Medal by Loyola College in 2004 for his Chesapeake Bay photography and was appointed by Gov. Martin O’Malley to the Maryland State Arts Council.

Horton, one of the most respected nature writers in the U.S., is a professor of practice in environmental studies at Salisbury University. He has received the John Burroughs Award for the best book of nature writing, as well as the David Brower Award from the Sierra Club. He is the author of eight books about Chesapeake Bay and covered the environment for the Baltimore Sun for 35 years. He recently paddled his kayak 550 miles around the Delmarva Peninsula and co-teaches a summer kayaking/camping course: “Exploring Delmarva: A Water’s Eye View.”

The fourth annual Tent Symposium is Sun., Sept. 28 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Guided walks will be offered from 10 a.m. to noon, and the Arboretum’s Native Plant Nursery, Visitor’s Center and gift shop will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. A catered lunch is included in the registration fee of $45 for members and $55 for non-members.

Advance registration is required at adkinsarboretum.org or by calling 410.634.2847, ext. 0.

Community Meeting to Discuss Current Issues on Animal Cruelty – September 24, 2014

YOU ARE INVITED!!!

SAVE THIS DATE AND TIME!!!
September 24, 2014, 6pm-8pm

Please join The Humane Society of the United States and the Caroline County Humane Society for a FREE community meeting to discuss current issues and learn how you can help animals.

This meeting will focus on animal cruelty and animal fighting and how citizens can help crack down on these illegal activities. We’ll give an overview of existing laws, hear about the work of the Caroline County Humane Society and local animal control officers to combat animal cruelty and fighting in the community. You’ll learn how to recognize dogfighting and animal cruelty and how to help your local law enforcement. If you’re concerned about animal cruelty, animal fighting or just generally creating a more humane community, please attend this free meeting!

RSVP today (tsantelli@humanesociety.org or 240-731-7862) and hope to see you there!

September 24, 2014, 6pm-8pm
Central Library, 2nd Floor Meeting Room
100 Market Street
Denton, MD 21629

More Arrested in Ongoing Heroin Distribution Investigation in Caroline County

Maryland State Police Press Release
07/25/2014 18:05

MORE ARRESTED IN ONGOING HEROIN DISTRIBUTION INVESTIGATION ON THE EASTERN SHORE

(DENTON, MD) – An additional ten indictments and arrests have resulted from the continuing cooperative cross-jurisdictional and multi-state drug investigation, with more expected as police continue to dismantle a drug trafficking organization they believe was responsible for the distribution of heroin and a variety of other drugs throughout the Upper Shore region.

Between July 23, 2014 and July 25, 2014 the following suspects were arrested on Caroline County Circuit Court indictments:

The first suspect is identified as Byron S. Drummond, 27, of Denton, Md. He was served charging documents on 7/25/2014 and charged with being a drug kingpin, possession of a large amount of a controlled dangerous substance (heroin), possession with intent to distribute narcotics, and two counts of possession of a controlled dangerous substance not marijuana. Drummond is currently incarcerated on an unrelated drug conviction in the Queen Anne’s County Detention Center. Drummond will be held on no bond pursuant to the indictment.

The second suspect is identified as Joseph C. Dean, 25, of Denton, Md. He was arrested on 7/19/2014 and charged with being in possession of a large amount of a controlled dangerous substance (heroin), conspiracy possession with intent to distribute narcotics (heroin), conspiracy possession with intent to distribute narcotics (cocaine) and possession of a firearm in connection to a drug trafficking crime. Dean was originally held on $50,000. He was released after posting bail and is awaiting trial.

The third suspect is identified as Taylor E. Gibson, 22, of Denton, Md. She was arrested on 7/19/2014 and charged with being a drug kingpin, conspiracy possession of a large amount of a controlled dangerous substance (heroin), conspiracy possession with intent to distribute narcotics (heroin), conspiracy possession with the intent to distribute narcotics (cocaine). Gibson was held without bond in the Caroline County Detention Center.

The fourth suspect is identified as Kentral Carter, 29, of Ridgely, Md. He was arrested on 7/21/2014 and charged with possession of a large amount of a controlled dangerous substance (heroin), conspiracy possession with intent to distribute narcotics (heroin), and conspiracy possession with intent to distribute narcotics (cocaine). During the arrest of Carter, he was found to be in possession of additional heroin, cocaine, oxycodone hydrochloride pills and marijuana. Carter was originally held on $75,000 pursuant to the indictment and an additional $12,000 for the drugs found on his person during his arrest. Carter was released after posting bail and is awaiting trial.

The fifth suspect is identified as Adam Hutson, 21, of Greensboro, Md. He was arrested on 7/21/2014 and charged with possession of a large amount of a controlled dangerous substance (heroin), conspiracy possession with intent to distribute narcotics (heroin), and conspiracy possession with intent to distribute narcotics (cocaine). Hutson was held on $60,000 bond and is currently in the Caroline County Detention Center.

The sixth suspect is identified as Jason Bowen, 32, of Greensboro, Md. He was arrested on 7/21/2014 and charged with conspiracy possession with intent to distribute narcotics (heroin). Bowen was held on $10,000 and is currently in the Caroline County Detention Center.

The seventh suspect is identified as Lexi Whiteley, 23, of Ridgely, Md. She was arrested on 7/21/2014 and charged with conspiracy possession with intent to distribute narcotics (heroin). Whiteley was held on $25,000 and is currently in the Caroline County Detention Center.

The eighth suspect is identified as Charles Outland, 33, of Denton, Md. He was arrested on 7/22/2014 and charged with conspiracy possession with intent to distribute narcotics (heroin) and conspiracy possession with intent to distribute narcotics (cocaine). Outland was held on $75,000 and is currently in the Caroline County Detention Center.

The ninth suspect is identified as Drew Brelia, 23 of Greensboro, Md. He was arrested on 7/24/2014 and charged with conspiracy possession with intent to distribute narcotics (heroin). Brelia was held without bond and is currently in the Caroline County Detention Center.

The tenth suspect is identified as Emily Hill, 20, of Ridgely, Md. She was arrested on 7/24/2014 and charged with conspiracy possession with intent to distribute narcotics (heroin). Hill was held without bond and is currently in the Caroline County Detention Center.

“We expect that these arrests will effectively cripple the local heroin trade for a long time, but arresting dealers will only slow the epidemic, not eliminate it,” Caroline County State’s Attorney Jonathan Newell said. “As long as there is a demand, there will eventually be a supply. We hope this investigation will reduce the numbers of new users and interrupt the supply to existing users, and drastically reduce the number of overdoses in this county. But at the same time, the current heroin addicts in our community need to take this opportunity to seek treatment so we don’t find ourselves right back in the same position a year from now. All suspects should be presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.”

A number of local, state and federal law enforcement agencies were involved in and provided support to this investigation. They included the Talbot County Narcotics Task Force, Homeland Security Investigations, Queen Anne’s County Drug Task Force, Dorchester County Drug Task Force, Denton Police Department, Caroline County Sheriff’s Office, Anne Arundel County Police Department, Baltimore Police Department, and Maryland State Police Units including the Centreville Barrack, State Apprehension Team, Gang Enforcement Unit, Special Tactical Assault Team Element, and the Criminal Enforcement Division.

Making the arrests this week, the Caroline County Drug Task Force was assisted by the Maryland State Police, the Maryland State Police Fugitive Apprehension Team, the Maryland State Police Field Operations Bureau, and the Caroline County Sheriff’s Office.

The investigation is continuing. Additional arrests and charges are expected.

MD Police Dismantle a Heroin Distribution Operation on the Eastern Shore

Maryland State Police Press Release
06/30/2014 15:00

FOUR ARRESTS MADE AND MORE PENDING AS POLICE DISMANTLE A HEROIN DISTRIBUTION OPERATION ON THE EASTERN SHORE

(DENTON, MD) – A cooperative cross-jurisdictional and multi-state drug investigation has led to at least four arrests with more expected as police dismantle a drug trafficking organization they believe was responsible for the distribution of heroin and a variety of other drugs throughout the Upper Shore region.

The first suspect is identified as Byron S. Drummond, 27, of Denton, Md. He is charged with being a drug kingpin, possession of a large amount of a controlled dangerous substance (heroin), possession with intent to distribute narcotics, and two counts of possession of a controlled dangerous substance not marijuana. Following his arrest, Drummond was ordered held without bail in the Queen Anne’s County Detention Center.

The second suspect is identified as Gary T. Kess, Jr., 36, of Windsor Mill, Md. He is charged with possession of a large amount of a controlled dangerous substance (heroin), possession with intent to distribute narcotics, and possession of a controlled dangerous substance not marijuana. Following his arrest, Kess was held without bail in the Anne Arundel County Detention Center.

The third suspect is identified as Joseph C. Dean, 25, of Denton, Md. He is charged with being a drug kingpin, possession of a large amount of a controlled dangerous substance (heroin), possession with intent to distribute narcotics, and possession of a controlled dangerous substance not marijuana. Following his arrest, Dean was held without bail in the Queen Anne’s County Detention Center.

The fourth suspect is identified as Taylor E. Gibson, 22, of Denton, Md. She is charged with being a drug kingpin, possession of a large amount of a controlled dangerous substance (heroin), possession with intent to distribute narcotics, two counts of possession of a controlled dangerous substance not marijuana, and possession of marijuana. Following her arrest, Gibson was held without bail in the Queen Anne’s County Detention Center.

An additional suspect, Bobby Jackson, of Delaware, was arrested by Delaware State Police after police in Maryland forwarded information developed in the investigation. Additional arrests and charges are anticipated as this investigation continues.

The arrests of the Maryland suspects occurred between June 23-24, 2014. During the investigation, police served 13 search warrants in Caroline County. Evidence recovered during the investigation includes seven handguns, one rifle, more than 230 grams of heroin, and quantities of cocaine, marijuana, oxycodone, and suboxone. Police also recovered more than $42,000 in cash and eight vehicles believed to be related to the drug distribution operation.

The investigation began about four months ago and was led by the Caroline County Drug Task Force. Information developed during the investigation indicates Drummond, Gibson, and Dean were part of a drug trafficking operation supplying drugs, especially heroin, throughout Caroline County and much of the Upper Shore. Investigators believe Kess was the source for the heroin Drummond and his organization was distributing.

“The success of this operation was rooted in the outstanding cooperation of a number of law enforcement agencies, all of which are to be commended for a job exceptionally well done,” Caroline County Sheriff Randy Bounds said. “We at the Caroline County Sheriff’s Office pledge our continued support for these types of initiatives, especially when considering the pain and devastation heroin has caused in our county and throughout the country.”

The Caroline County State’s Attorney’s Office was actively involved in providing guidance and support to police during this investigation. The suspects charged as drug kingpins will be prosecuted on those charges in Caroline County.

“This ongoing investigation represents the focused efforts by our local task force with full cooperation of the Maryland State Police, the Federal government and local police agencies,” Caroline County State’s Attorney Jonathan Newell said. “I expect those combined efforts will put a significant dent in the Caroline County heroin trade and success will be measured by a reduction in lives lost or destroyed through heroin use.”

“The cross-border and multi-jurisdictional focus of Maryland State Police criminal investigations is aimed at criminal enterprises just like this one,” Maryland State Police Superintendent Colonel Marcus L. Brown said. “I join Sheriff Bounds in applauding the cooperative partnership of local, state and federal law enforcement officers who worked together to disrupt this major drug trafficking organization supplying the Upper Shore. One of the ways we will stop the increase in heroin overdoses in Maryland is to take down those major traffickers responsible for bringing heroin into the state. This is the unique role of the State Police and one we will continue to fulfill in the days ahead.”

Last week, police developed information that Drummond, Dean and Gibson were meeting Kess to purchase heroin in Anne Arundel County. The meeting occurred on the evening of June 23rd. After the meeting, Anne Arundel County Police Narcotics Unit investigators stopped Kess in his vehicle. He was arrested and charged as a drug kingpin. Heroin, cocaine and cash were found in his vehicle. Maryland law states a person can be charged with ‘possession of a large amount of heroin’ if the amount is 28 grams or more.

Following the meeting with Kess, members of the Maryland State Apprehension Team and State Police Gang Enforcement Unit stopped Drummond, Dean, and Gibson on Rt. 50 in Queen Anne’s Co. Heroin, cocaine, oxycodone, marijuana, and cash were recovered from the suspects and their vehicle.

A number of local, state and federal law enforcement agencies were involved in and provided support to this investigation. They included the Talbot County Narcotics Task Force, Homeland Security Investigations, Queen Anne’s County Drug Task Force, Dorchester County Drug Task Force, Denton Police Department, Caroline County Sheriff’s Office, Anne Arundel County Police Department, Baltimore Police Department, and Maryland State Police Units including the Centreville Barrack, State Apprehension Team, Gang Enforcement Unit, Special Tactical Assault Team Element, and the Criminal Enforcement Division.

RABIES CLINICS hosted by the Caroline County Humane Society

RABIES CLINICS hosted by the Caroline County Humane Society next week!

Wednesday June 18 5 to 7 pm Goldsboro Fire Department, 700 Old Line Rd, Goldsboro MD

Sunday June 22 2 to 4 pm Preston Fire Department, 3680 Choptank Road, Preston MD

Vaccinations just $5. Micro chipping available. Please have all dogs on leash and cats and ferrets in carriers

For more information call CCHS at 410 820 1600

Surface Treatments, Works by Marian Glebes, on View through May 30, 2014 at Adkins Arboretum

Adkins Arboretum
RIDGELY, MD
April 3, 2014

If you’ve ever made a wish by blowing the seeds off a fluffy dandelion, you’ll want to see Marian Glebes’s art at Adkins Arboretum. On view through May 30 in the Arboretum Visitor’s Center, her small, intimate works show the evidence of how she rescued dandelion seeds after they’d been wished on and preserved dead butterflies by carefully stitching their torn wings back together.

Glebes sees the natural world with childlike wonder, even as she recognizes the futility of trying to save its plants and animals from death and decay. There will be a reception on Sat., April 19 from 3 to 5 p.m. to meet her and learn about the ideas behind these gentle, fragile works of art.

This Baltimore artist began working with dandelions when she was earning her Master of Fine Arts degree at University of Maryland, Baltimore County. At the time, she was considering our paradoxical love of nature and the urge to control it and shape it to fit our plans. Using the suburban environment and the ideal of pristine green lawns, free of weeds, as an example, she began a series of work called “In Defense of Native Soil.” She invited people to come and wish on a dandelion, then she painstakingly glued the seeds onto paper, thus preventing them from growing to become weeds in a lawn.

Glebes explained, “I was really inspired by the performance artists of the ’60s and ’70s and how they could change the way you see the world without lecturing you, without giving you a speech, without being violent. So the performance is me making these things and the labor involved. The object is sort of a relic of thinking about why we try to protect or preserve and what preservation does to objects.”

With rows of seeds delicately marching across pure white paper, four of her dandelion works are included in this show, along with works that preserve butterflies, cicadas, rose petals and garlic skins. Glebes finds remarkable ways of drawing attention to the beauty of their shapes and textures, but most particularly, she conveys an aching sense of their preciousness and fragility.

Glebes began working with insects when she was on an artist’s residency in Ohio. Frustrated that the project she was pursuing in water research wasn’t going well, she noticed a butterfly that had died on the windowsill of her studio. Using a needle and thread, she began to mend its torn wings.

“It was like, I’ll fix this butterfly because I can’t save the world,” she explained. “And this has now been my meditation work when I can’t be working on something else. I keep coming back to it.”

Because insects are so fragile, Glebes often has to make many “attempts” at preserving them before she is successful. The titles of her works reflect this. “Untitled (stitched, fourth attempt)” displays a moth whose wings were finally mended after three failed attempts.

Meditative and inventive, Glebes’s work is very much about our familiar everyday world. We see insects and dandelions all the time, but Glebes inspires a fresh look at how they live and change and die. In so doing, she makes us think about our human place in nature and about our impulses both to love it and to control it.

“In the context of landscape, we’re trying to do good but we might also be a force of evil,” she said. “We need a road, but we’re still cutting into the landscape. It’s like mending cloth. Every time you put a stitch in it, you’re mending it, but you’re still putting a hole in it. I think it’s something we need to be more mindful of.”

This show is part of Adkins Arboretum’s ongoing exhibition series of work on natural themes by regional artists. It is on view through May 30 at the Arboretum Visitor’s Center located at 12610 Eveland Road near Tuckahoe State Park in Ridgely. Contact the Arboretum at 410-634-2847, ext. 0 or info@adkinsarboretum.org for gallery hours.