Category Archives: Lecture/Talk

Local author Ernst Selig discusses new book at the Caroline County Public Library

Caroline County Public Library
March 30, 2015

What would it be like to escape the enemy and return with an army to defeat that very same enemy? Hear about it from the man who escaped Nazi Germany and returned there as an enlisted man, and later an officer, in the United States Army.

Meet Ernst Selig as he discusses his recently published book, “The Troops Need Justice, Training and Knowledge” on Saturday, April 18, 1:00PM at the Central Library in Denton. In the book, Mr. Selig reflects on how training and justice are vital to a person’s development and satisfaction in life, and how he learned these lessons through practical experience with the U.S. Army.

As a Holocaust survivor, WWII veteran and a Chevalier of the Légion d’Honneur, France’s highest decoration, Mr. Selig shares his well-earned wisdom with the matter-of-fact humor that is the hallmark of the greatest generation.

Caroline County Public Library’s “Meet The Author” series to feature author George Merrill

Caroline County Public Library
August 2013

The Caroline County Public Library in Greensboro will host noted local essayist and photographer, George Merrill, for a book talk and book signing, on Wednesday, September 25th at 7pm.

Mr. Merrill’s will discuss and sign copies of his recent book about life around the Chesapeake Bay, The Bay of the Mother of God: A Yankee Discovers the Chesapeake Bay, a collection of essays about the people, places, and creatures around the Chesapeake Bay.

Admission is free; no registration is required. For more information, call 410-482-2173 or visit www.carolib.org.

Caroline County Public Library Celebrates “King Peggy”, the 6TH Annual One Maryland, One Book

Caroline County Public Library
August 2013

Read the book the whole state is reading: “King Peggy: An American Secretary, Her Royal Destiny, and the Inspiring Story of How She Changed an African Village” by Peggielene Bartels and Eleanor Herman.

The Maryland Humanities Council’s statewide author tour kicks off in Caroline County! King Peggy herself, accompanied by an African drummer, will speak at North Caroline High School on River Road in Ridgely on Saturday, September 7 at 2PM. This program is sponsored by the Friends of the Library.

The Central Library in Denton will host “Bringing Water to Africa “ on Thursday, September 12 at 7PM. Caroline County residents Ken Wood and William Sparks will share their experiences with water issues in Africa. Also at Denton, Talkin’ Pictures, an ongoing film series sponsored by the Friends of the Library will feature a documentary called “The Flow: For Love of Water” on Thursday, September 26 at 7PM.

“King Peggy” book discussions will be held at the Central Library and the Federalsburg Branch.
For more information about these programs, contact the library at 410-470-1343 or visit www.carolib.org.

Adkins Arboretum Offers Soup ‘N Walk Program on November 17, 2012

RIDGELY, MD
NOVEMBER 8, 2012

Learn about native nuts and berries that provide food for wildlife when Adkins Arboretum offers a popular Soup ’n Walk program on Sat., Nov. 17. Following a guided walk through the Arboretum’s woodland, meadows and wetland, enjoy a delicious and nutritious lunch along with a brief lesson about the meal’s nutritional value. Copies of recipes are provided.

The hour-long walk will focus on dazzling yellow color and nuts and berries that nourish wildlife during winter. Plants of interest include tulip tree, paw paw, and hickory leaves, hickory and beech nuts, oak acorns, and the berries of dogwood, holly, sumac, hearts a bursting, devil’s walking stick, and Jack-in-the-pulpit. The menu includes pumpkin lentil soup, Waldorf salad, wheat flaxseed bread and Pfefferneuse cookies.

Each Soup ’n Walk program is $20 per person for members, $25 per person for the general public. Register at www.adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0. To schedule Soup ’n Walk programs for groups of 15 or more, contact Ginna Tiernan, Adult Program Coordinator, at 410-634-2847, ext. 27 or gtiernan@adkinsarboretum.org.

Adkins Arboretum is a 400-acre native garden and preserve at the headwaters of the Tuckahoe Creek in Caroline County. Open year round, the Arboretum offers educational programs for all ages about nature and gardening. Through its Campaign to Build a Green Legacy, it will build the W. Flaccus and Ruth B. Stifel Center at Adkins Arboretum and a “green” entranceway to broaden educational offerings and research initiatives promoting best practices in conservation and land stewardship. For additional information about Arboretum programs, visit www.adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Adkins Arboretum Offers Fall Soup ‘N Walk Programs

RIDGELY, MD
SEPTEMBER 15, 2012

Adkins Arboretum has announced the fall lineup for its popular Soup ’n Walk programs. Discover meadow grasses, fall’s yellow and purple flowers, mushrooms, nuts, berries and fall color. Following a guided walk through the Arboretum’s woodland, meadows and wetland, enjoy a delicious and nutritious lunch along with a brief lesson about the meal’s nutritional value. Copies of recipes are provided. Offerings include:

Sunny Meadows
Sat., Sept. 22, 11 a.m.–1:30 p.m.

Catch a glimpse of golden brown grasses and yellow and purple flowers. Plants of interest include milkweed, black-eyed Susan, goldenrod, Maryland golden aster, purple love grass, pearly everlasting, Indian grass and big bluestem. Menu: vegetable barley soup with oats, roasted red beets and mesclun salad, zucchini yeast bread, and blackberry and peach crisp.


Grasses, Mushrooms, and Early Fall Color
Sat., Oct. 20, 11 a.m.–1:30 p.m.

Look for sure signs of fall along the meadow edges, see how grasses have changed since the September walk, and seek out mushrooms in the cool fall forest. Plants of interest include Indian grass, big bluestem, purple love grass, pearly everlasting, milkweed pods, devil’s walking stick, and the red and orange leaves of sweet gum, sassafras, sumac, tupelo and dogwood. Menu: carrot ginger soup, asparagus and red pepper salad, barley oat wheat bread, and cranberry apple pie.

Nuts and Berries for Wildlife
Sat., Nov. 17, 11 a.m.–1:30 p.m.

Search for dazzling yellow fall color and nuts and berries that nourish wildlife during winter. Plants of interest include tulip tree, paw paw, and hickory leaves, hickory and beech nuts, oak acorns, and the berries of dogwood, holly, sumac, hearts a bursting, devil’s walking stick, and Jack-in-the-pulpit. Menu: pumpkin lentil soup, Waldorf salad, wheat flaxseed bread, and Pfefferneuse cookies.

Each Soup ’n Walk program is $20 per person for members, $25 per person for the general public. Register at www.adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0. To schedule Soup ’n Walk programs for groups of 15 or more, contact Ginna Tiernan, Adult Program Coordinator, at 410-634-2847, ext. 27 or gtiernan@adkinsarboretum.org.

Adkins Arboretum is a 400-acre native garden and preserve at the headwaters of the Tuckahoe Creek in Caroline County. Open year round, the Arboretum offers educational programs for all ages about nature and gardening. Through its Campaign to Build a Green Legacy, it will build the W. Flaccus and Ruth B. Stifel Center at Adkins Arboretum and a “green” entranceway to broaden educational offerings and research initiatives promoting best practices in conservation and land stewardship. For additional information about Arboretum programs, visit www.adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Learn About Edible Landscapes at Adkins Arboretum

RIDGELY, MD
SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

Beyond their beauty and bountiful flavors, edible landscapes provide socio-cultural, economical and environmental benefits within homes and communities. The food and garden movement is bringing to light the unsung role of edibles as a sustainability catalyst for green infrastructure design solutions.

On Sat., Sept. 15, join Jeanette Ankoma-Sey at Adkins Arboretum to learn how edibles can play a key role both in planning and design and as tools to restore, mitigate and improve how landscapes function to support stormwater management, soil health, and habitat creation and biodiversity.

A trained landscape designer and horticulturist who lives and works in Alexandria, Va., Ankoma-Sey specializes in plant-based landscape solutions with a particular interest in those that engage users with their surroundings: edible gardens, children’s gardens, campus design, public and urban spaces, and more. She teaches edible landscape and ecology and the environment courses within the George Washington University’s sustainable landscape design master’s program.

The program begins at 1 p.m. in the Arboretum Visitor’s Center, and coincides with the Arboretum’s Fall Native Plant Sale Weekend. The program is $15 for members, $20 for the general public. Register at www.adkinsarboretum.org or call 410.634.2847, ext. 0.

Adkins Arboretum’s Fall Nature Programs for Preschoolers

RIDGELY, MD
AUGUST 17, 2012

Goldenrod, goats, butterflies and bats! Join Adkins Arboretum’s preschool program this fall, and engage your young child with nature. Led by Arboretum Youth Program Coordinator Jenny Houghton, this popular series of eight classes for three- to five-year-olds is offered on Tuesday mornings beginning Sept. 18.

Registration is required for preschool programs. The fee is $60 for members, $75 for the general public for all eight classes in the series. A $10 discount is offered for siblings. Classes run from 10 to 11:30 a.m. and include a craft and a healthy snack. Enrollment is limited, so early registration is recommended. For more information or to register, visit www.adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Programs include:
Meet Lily—Tues., Sept. 18

Visit the Arboretum’s goat herd, led by the lovely Lily, and learn how goats are used to eat troublesome weeds. Children will make goat puppets, sample goat milk, and have their picture taken with Lily.


Monarch Migration—Tues., Sept. 25

Make a wish on a fluffy milkweed seed and learn about the beautiful monarch butterflies whose caterpillars depend on milkweed for food. Children will use hand lenses to examine monarch chrysalises in the meadow, make a butterfly craft, and enjoy books about monarch travels with their snack.

Teddy Bear Picnic—Tues., Oct. 2
Children and their teddy bear friends are invited to a forest picnic! The morning will include a bear hunt along woodland paths (bears rarely wander to the Eastern Shore, but it’s still fun to look), bear songs, and a teddy bear bandana craft.

Glorious Goldenrod—Tues., Oct. 9
Goldenrod is often blamed for sniffles and sneezes, but this lovely flower is actually not a trigger for fall allergies. Children will look for goldenrod in the meadow and gather flowers to press for a long-lasting bouquet.

Nuts for Squirrels—Tues., Oct. 16
Are you nuts for squirrels? Learn about these furry forest friends and welcome fall with a forest squirrel search. Children will create squirrel napkin rings and listen to an acorn story while munching on nutty snacks.

The Leaves on the Trees—Tues., Oct. 23
Celebrate fall colors by learning about leaves on a forest scavenger hunt. Children will sort leaves by shape and color, rake leaves into a gigantic leaf pile, and make leaf creatures to take home.

Going Batty—Tues., Oct. 30
Bats: terrifying vampires or cuddly Stellalunas? Learn the facts about the world’s only flying mammal and try navigating the meadow bat-style. Activities will include a bat mobile craft and Halloween-themed snacks and stories.

Scouts and Maidens—Tues., Nov. 6
Who were the first people to live on the Eastern Shore? Children will learn about the Woodland Indians through creative play, taking part in a Native American corn game, collecting sticks for a pretend campfire, and exploring the Paw Paw Playground wigwams.

Adkins Arboretum is a 400-acre native garden and preserve at the headwaters of the Tuckahoe Creek in Caroline County. Open year round, the Arboretum offers educational programs for all ages about nature and gardening. Through its Campaign to Build a Green Legacy, the Arboretum will build a new LEED-certified Arboretum Center and entranceway to broaden educational offerings and research initiatives promoting best practices in conservation and land stewardship. For additional information about Arboretum programs, visit www.adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

 Adkins Arboretum Youth Program Coordinator Jenny Houghton will lead a series of nature programs for preschoolers beginning Tues., Sept. 18.

Adkins Arboretum Youth Program Coordinator Jenny Houghton will lead a series of nature programs for preschoolers.

Fall Education Programs at Adkins Arboretum

RIDGELY, MD
AUGUST 17, 2012

Adkins Arboretum is offering a full slate of programs for fall, including guided walks,landscape design, art and holiday decorating. Offerings include:


Nature as Muse
Wednesdays, Sept. 5, Oct. 3, Nov. 7 and Dec. 5, 10 a.m.–1 p.m.

Each month this writing group follows a different Arboretum path to quietly observe nature in detail and gain inspiration for writing. Enjoy how the Arboretum paths and the paths in your mind can lead you on an unpredictable but delightful journey. No previous writing experience necessary. Dress for both indoor and outdoor forest adventure. Registration required. This program is free with admission.

Second Saturday Guided Walks
Saturdays, Sept. 8 and Oct. 13, 1–2 p.m.

Horticulturalist Eric Wittman will lead a walk about gardening with ornamental native plants. Learn about native plants and how they can become a greater part of your home gardening experience. Registration required. This program is free with admission.

Fall Soup ’n Walks
Saturdays, Sept. 22, Oct. 20 and Nov. 17, 11 a.m.–1:30 p.m.

Following a guided walk through the Arboretum’s woodland, meadows and wetland, enjoy a delicious and nutritious lunch along with a brief lesson about the meal’s nutritional value. The September walk will focus on the Arboretum’s sunny meadows. October’s program will explore fall color, mushrooms and grasses; and November’s walk will focus on nuts and berries for wildlife. Registration required. Fee: $20 members, $25 general public.

Fall Harvest
Fri., Sept. 7, 10 a.m.–noon

Just because we can stop worrying about what to do with yet another summer squash doesn’t mean the food season is over. Late summer is the time to plant a fall garden and the time you’ll find the widest variety of produce all year. Elizabeth Beggins will show how a little preparation now can yield big returns as the weather turns cooler. Registration required. Fee: $15 members, $20 general public.


Identifying Fall Wildflowers
Sat., Sept. 8, 10 a.m.–noon

Learn to identify the Arboretum’s beautiful yellow, white and purple autumn flowers. Take a walk with ecologist Dr. Sylvan Kaufman for a close look at Delmarva’s native fall wildflowers. Identification will focus on flower and leaf characteristics and learning to recognize plant families. Participants should bring a wildflower field guide and a hand lens if they have them. Registration required. Fee: $15 members, $20 general public.

Living in the Trees: Speaking to the Times
Sat., Sept. 8, 6:30–9 p.m.

Join a special program in which music and art cast a spell on one of the last evenings of summer. The Pam Ortiz Band will set the scene with thought-provoking songs that probe the bittersweet richness of life in our times. As the dusk fades into night, take a walk into the forest to see Night Walk, photographer Penny Harris’s images of human figures magically projected onto the trees. As if the spirits of the trees themselves have become visible, Harris’s figures hauntingly evoke the primal link between trees and human life. After a walk through the woods, lit by luminarias and flashlights, return to the Visitor’s Center for more music and refreshments. Registration required. Fee: $20 members, $25 general public.

Plants with a Purpose: Ecological Design and Edible Landscapes
Sat., Sept. 15, 1–2:30 p.m.

Beyond their beauty and bountiful flavors, edible landscapes provide socio-cultural, economical and environmental benefits within homes and communities. The food and garden movement is bringing to light the unsung role of edibles as a sustainability catalyst for green infrastructure design solutions. Jeanette Ankoma-Sey will present a series of various approaches to explore how edibles can play a key role in planning and design and as tools to restore, mitigate and improve how landscapes function to support stormwater management, soil health and habitat creation and biodiversity. Registration required. Fee: $15 members, $20 general public.

Backyard Hobby Farm Field Trip
Sat., Sept. 22, 10–11:30 a.m.

Robyn Affron and her arborist husband have transformed their half-acre property in Chestertown into a sustainable, productive and lively oasis. Share Robyn’s journey and joy of backyard farming and gardening with this visit to her hobby farm and lush chicken garden. See sustainable land practices in action, and meet the farm animals. Taste the difference of fresh free range chicken eggs by taking home a few fresh eggs to share with family and friends. Participants will meet at Robyn’s home in Chestertown. Registration required. Fee: $15 members, $20 general public.

Wetland Plant ID: Know ’em and Grow ’em
Wed., Sept. 26, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.

Facilitated by Environmental Concern, an organization dedicated to understanding wetlands, this program provides educators and docents with an understanding of wetland plant ecology and adaptations, and the resources to identify plant species in the field. Materials will also cover native and non-native species and planting tips. Participants will also gain inspiration to construct schoolyard or backyard wetland habitats. Registration required at www.wetland.org. Fee: $40.

The Second Annual Tent Symposium present: Sources of Inspiration
Sun., Sept. 30, noon–4 p.m.

Immerse yourself in a full day at Adkins Arboretum for the second annual fall symposium. Take a walk along the paths that bisect the Arboretum’s rich and unique native plant habitat—mature and young native forests, meadows, wetland and native gardens. Visit the Native Plant Nursery and plant sale, then enjoy lunch followed by inspiring presentations by Thomas Rainer and Dan Benarcik. Registration required. Fee: $65 members, $85 general public.

Collecting and Propagating Native Seeds
Tues., Oct. 2, 1–3 p.m.

Discover the basics of harvesting, processing, cleaning, storing and propagating seeds in this program with ecologist Dr. Sylvan Kaufman. Following a brief introduction to seed biology, participants will go into the Arboretum’s gardens, meadows and woods to collect seeds and then process them and learn about seed propagation at the Arboretum’s Native Plant Nursery. Registration required. Fee: $15 members, $20 general public.

Nature-Inspired Clayworks
Fri., Oct. 5, 10 a.m.–1 p.m.

Join Paul Aspell to create nature-inspired ceramics using hand-building techniques demonstrated in the first session of this three-part series. Paul is known for his combination of hand-built forms with thrown elements. He incorporates elements of the Eastern Shore into his pottery, as demonstrated by his washes and glazes and his use of shells and old bricks to leave imprints in the clay. Subsequent sessions will be held Fri., Oct. 19 at Paul’s Ridgely Studio and Fri., Oct. 26 at the Arboretum. Registration required. Fee: $55 members, $75 general public.

Foraging in Fall with Bill Schindler
Sun., Oct. 7, 1–3 p.m.

Bill Schindler, Ph.D. returns to the Arboretum to lead this hands-on workshop that will immerse participants in the exciting, sustainable and nutritious world of foraging for wild plants. Participants will be taken into the field to learn how to identify, harvest, and prepare many of spring’s wild edibles. It doesn’t get more local or organic than this! Registration required. Fee: $15 members, $20 general public.

First Detector Training for Insect and Disease Pests of Plants
Fri., Oct. 12, 1–3 p.m.

Join the front line of defense against new pests and diseases of plants. Adkins Arboretum is part of the Sentinel Plant Network, a network of botanical gardens that is on the lookout for emerald ash borer, Asian longhorn beetle, sudden oak death and other pests and diseases that threaten forest health. This workshop offers training for volunteers who can help spot potential problems, collect samples, and submit them to insect and disease specialists in Maryland. Registration required. This program is free with admission.

Landscape Design Workshop
Sat., Oct. 13, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

This workshop will address the typical challenges of homeowners in the Chesapeake Bay region. Three experienced landscape designers and avid gardeners will lead you through an all-day intensive design session. Come with your challenges and dreams, and leave with a landscape plan, ideas, and confidence to transform your home landscape for your enjoyment and pride. Workshop leaders are Arboretum Executive Director Ellie Altman; landscape architect Barbara McClinton, formerly of the Baltimore landscape architecture and land planning firm Daft, McCune, Walker; and landscape designer and native plant enthusiast Chris Pax, a graduate of the George Washington University sustainable landscape design master’s program. Registration required. Fee: $85 members, $110 general public.


Copper Bracelet Workshop
Sun., Oct. 14, 1–3 p.m.

Create your own power bracelet with instruction and guidance from renowned local artist Sue Stockman. Sue will guide participants in the process of forming 12-gauge copper wire into a bracelet armature and its adornment to create a unique piece of jewelry. All materials are included. Registration required. Fee: $35 members, $50 general public.

An Arboretum Campout
Sat., Oct. 20, 5 p.m.

Enjoy a fall campout under the stars. Roast s’mores over a woodland bonfire, take a flashlight hike, and celebrate fall colors on a morning tree walk. Delmarva Stargazers will be on hand to uncover the mysteries of the night sky, and children will make a fall craft to take home. Registration required. Fee: $20/person or $70/family for members, $25/person or $85/family for the general public.

Designing for Waterfront Landscapes
Sat., Oct. 27, 10 a.m.–noon

Waterfront properties present homeowners with a slew of both daunting challenges and precious opportunities. Join landscape designer and native plant enthusiast Chris Pax, a graduate of the George Washington University sustainable landscape design master’s program, for a look at plants that are good for waterfront landscape conditions and to review some of the special rules and regulations that may apply in your county. Registration required. Fee: $35 members, $45 general public.

Holiday Illumination
Fri., Nov. 2, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.

Join artist Lee D’Zmura to create an illuminated letter with the choice of either a winter botanical such as winterberry, mistletoe or pine or a traditional illumination with seasonal references. D’Zmura earned her certificate in botanical art at Brookside Gardens School of Botanical Art and Illustration and now teaches classes in advanced watercolor at Brookside. Registration required. Fee: $55 members, $70 general.

Rain Gardens as Outdoor Classrooms
Sat., Nov. 3, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.

This one-day course facilitated by Environmental Concern introduces educators and docents to the concept of rain gardens and their value as schoolyard or backyard habitats. Participants will understand how rain gardens benefit the environment by improving the watershed and how they can be used as an extension of the classroom. Participants will leave with the basic knowledge of how to plan, design and implement a rain garden from start to finish. Registration required at www.wetland.org. Fee: $40.

Talking Bones
Sat., Nov. 10 1–2:30 p.m.

Join educator and naturalist Jenny Houghton to unravel the life stories of local wildlife through their bones. Participants will study cranial structures for clues to wildlife identification, as well as the creature’s age, diet and health. Registration required. Fee: $15 members, $20 general public.

Creating a Holiday Wildlife Tree
Sat., Dec. 1, 10–11:30 a.m.

Join Youth Program Coordinator Jenny Houghton in making natural ornaments designed to welcome wildlife. Raisin icicles, birdseed baskets, cranberry wreaths, suet pinecones, and more will make your outdoor tree festive and inviting to hungry creatures. All materials are provided; participants will create a variety of ornaments to take home. The workshop will close with hot chocolate and a holiday reading.. Registration required. Fee: $12/adult or $20 family for members, $15/adult or $25/family for general public.

Holiday Decorating Workshop
Sat., Dec. 1, 10–noon

Create beautiful natural decorations for the holidays at this workshop led by Nancy Beatty, garden designer and Arboretum docent. Participants will make elegant home decorations from fresh cedar, pine and boxwood greens and other natural materials. All supplies will be provided, but if you have a special container you would like to use, please bring it. Bring a sturdy box or basket to carry home your creations. Registration required. Fee: $35 members, $45 general public.

Build a Wave Hill Chair
Sat., Dec. 15, 10 a.m.–noon

Chanticleer Garden Horticulturalist and craftsman Dan Benarcik returns to Adkins Arboretum to lead a workshop in the construction of the Wave Hill chair. Based on a 1918 design by acclaimed Dutch architect Gerrit Rietveld and modified in the 1960s, the chair was popularized in the garden at Wave Hill in the Bronx. This timeless comfortable chair is suitable for any garden setting. Join Dan to build your own chair at a significant discount from the retail price of $245. All materials, including pre-cut cedar and hardware, are included in the fee. Registration required. Fee: $150 members, $185 general public.

Registration is required for all programs. Visit www.adkinsarboretum.org for full program descriptions or to register, or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Adkins Arboretum is a 400-acre native garden and preserve at the headwaters of the Tuckahoe Creek in Caroline County. Open year round, the Arboretum offers educational programs for all ages about nature and gardening. Through its Campaign to Build a Green Legacy, the Arboretum will build a new LEED-certified Arboretum Center and entranceway to broaden educational offerings and research initiatives promoting best practices in conservation and land stewardship. For additional information about Arboretum programs, visit www.adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Dr. Bill Schindler, foreground, will return to Adkins Arboretum Oct. 7 to lead a program on foraging for wild plants. The Arboretum is offering a full slate of programs for adults this fall. For more information, visit www.adkinsarboretum.org.

Dr. Bill Schindler, foreground, will return to Adkins Arboretum Oct. 7 to lead a program on foraging for wild plants. The Arboretum is offering a full slate of programs for adults this fall. For more information, visit www.adkinsarboretum.org.

2012 Friends of the Library Palooza: How to Publish a Book

2012 Friends of the Library Palooza: How to Publish a Book

Special Guest Local Author Judy Reveal
Win a Kindle!

Join us for our annual celebration Saturday, June 16, 10am – Noon at the Central Library, Denton, 2nd floor! Learn the steps for publishing a book from a panel of published local authors. How do I find a publisher? Do I need a literary agent? What are tips for actually finishing the book?

In addition to this learning from our special guests, we will also…

• Celebrate the past year’s accomplishments
• Share the future plans of the Library
• Elect Directors for the Friends’ Board
• Meet others who are passionate about the Library
• Discuss specific activities that Friends can join, including:
o Gold Books: a fundraiser that allows customers to dedicate their favorite books
o Discount Card: a Friends’ members-only card with discounts to area businesses
o Volunteering: non-traditional ways to work inside the Library
• Give away a Kindle! Enter into a free drawing. (Must be present to win. Rules apply.)

Come join us for the Friends of the Library Annual Palooza! For information, call 410-479-1343.

Author Andrea Wulf Returns to Adkins Arboretum to Discuss Science of the Enlightenment in Chasing Venus

RIDGELY, MD
APRIL 23, 2012

On two days in 1761 and 1769, astronomers across the world cast their eyes to the sky to witness a rare sight: Venus traveling across the face of the sun. The two transits were to become the most significant astronomical events in scientific history, as by recording the path of Venus and comparing results, these men hoped to calculate the dimensions of the solar system—one of the most pressing questions of the Enlightenment.

On Sun., May 20, New York Times Best Selling and award-winning author Andrea Wulf returns to Adkins Arboretum to discuss this extraordinary story as recounted in her newest book, Chasing Venus. Told as a race across the world, Chasing Venus features a cast of some of the most recognizable names in history, including Benjamin Franklin, Mason and Dixon, and Catherine the Great. It is a thrilling adventure story, a tale of personal tragedy and obsession, and an inspiring account of Enlightenment science and man’s quest to understand the universe.

Wulf’s talk begins at noon. Advance registration is required, and early registration is encouraged as seating is limited. The fee is $15 for members, $20 for the general public.

Andrea Wulf was born in India and moved to Germany as a child. She lives in Britain, where she trained as a design historian at the Royal College of Art. She is the author of The Brother Gardeners: Botany, Empire and the Birth of an Obsession (longlisted for the 2008 Samuel Johnson Prize and winner of the 2010 American Horticultural Society Book Award), as well as Founding Gardeners: The Revolutionary Generation, Nature, and the Shaping of the American Nation, and co-author of This Other Eden: Seven Great Gardens and 300 Years of English History. She has written for the New York Times, the LA Times, The Wall Street Journal, the Sunday Times, the Guardian, and many others. She is a three-time fellow of the International Center for Jefferson Studies at Monticello. andreawulf.com