Category Archives: Ridgely

Adkins Arboretum Announces Spring Open House, Native Plant Sale

Adkins Arboretum
(RIDGELY, MD—April 11, 2017)

Adkins Arboretum, offering the Chesapeake gardener the largest selection of native plants for more than 20 years, announces its Spring Open House & Native Plant Sale weekend, April 28-30, 2017. The sale benefits the Arboretum’s education programs and affords the public an opportunity to learn about the Delmarva’s native plants and their connection to a healthy Chesapeake Bay.

Plants for sale include a large variety of native perennials, ferns, vines, grasses and flowering shrubs and trees for spring planting. Native flowers and trees provide food and habitat for wildlife and make colorful additions to home landscapes, whether in a perennial border, a woodland garden or a restoration project. Tall spikes of purplish flowers grace blue wild indigo, while native honeysuckle entices hummingbirds. Cardinal flower, ferns and Joe-pye attract frogs, butterflies and dragonflies, and native azaleas present a veritable rainbow of bloom colors. Presale orders may be placed at adkinsplants.com through April 16. Simply place your order, and your plants will be ready for pick-up during the Open House weekend.

All are invited on Fri., April 28, 2017 from 2 to 7 p.m. to shop in a fun and festive environment with live music, light fare, a silent auction, a cash wine and beer bar beginning at 4 p.m., and drawing of the winning ticket for the Arboretum’s Native Table raffle.

The Open House continues Sat. and Sun., April 29 and 30 with plant sales, music by Driven Women, guided walks, coffee, pastries for sale by Steve Konopelski of Denton’s Turnbridge Point Bed & Breakfast and much more. Hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday and noon to 4 p.m. on Sunday. Following the Open House, plants will be for sale at the Visitor’s Center throughout the growing season.

The Arboretum is a participating nursery in the Marylanders Plant Trees native tree discount program. For any native tree valued at $50 or more, shoppers will receive a $25 discount. Some of the special larger trees available for this discount include birch, dogwood, redbud and magnolia.

The Arboretum gift shop will be open during the Nursery Opening Day and will offer books and nature-inspired gifts for gardeners. Members receive a 10% discount on plant, gift shop and book purchases. Members at the Contributor level ($100) and above receive a 20% discount on plants.

Native trumpet honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens) and many other vines, trees, shrubs and perennials will be for sale at Adkins Arboretum’s Spring Open House & Native Plant Sale, April 28-30. Photo by Kellen McCluskey.

Native trumpet honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens) and many other vines, trees, shrubs and perennials will be for sale at Adkins Arboretum’s Spring Open House & Native Plant Sale, April 28-30. Photo by Kellen McCluskey.

15th Annual Chrome City Ride is July 31, 2016

15th Annual Chrome City Ride
RIDGELY, Md.

From custom and classic to a few concept luxury vehicles, the 15th Annual Chrome City Ride is set to take place on Sunday, July 31st 2016 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Benedictine School in Ridgely. All motorcycles, street rods and custom cars are invited to participate.

Each year the event draws hundreds of motorcycles, street rods and custom cars from around the region to raise money for Benedictine’s annual fund needs that includes tuition assistance, technology tools and renovation projects on campus.

Riders gathering at designated registration locations in Laurel, Annapolis, Salisbury and Easton will cruise in police escort convoys to the Benedictine School campus. Spectators will get the chance to hear the roar of vehicles as riders come down the mile drive onto campus.

On display at this year’s event will be a 1941 Willys Pro-Street Coupe, a unique donation from a New Jersey car collector with an appraised value of $72,000. The hot rod will go to the highest bidder through an online auction on Ebay Motors.

Scheduled activities include raffles prizes which include a weekend stay in an Affinia Hotel in New York City and the Tidewater Inn in Easton, Md., along with door prizes, car contests and foo. According to event chairman Spud Blake, the event is organized and produced by volunteers, primarily from state and local law enforcement.

“We are so appreciative of the committee members who help put on this event each year,” said Blake. “The excitement these folks have brought to the campus at Benedictine over the last fourteen years is impressive.”

The event’s $25-per-rider registration fee provides each rider with an official Ride T-shirt, catered lunch, and entertainment and a day of fun showing off their chrome to an appreciative crowd.

Spectators are also welcome, and their $25 registration fee also provides them with an official Ride T-shirt, lunch and a day of fun. Everyone goes home with something!

Riders are expected to arrive on campus around 11:00 a.m. The event ends at 2 p.m.

To register, visit Chrome City Ride at benschool.org or call 410-634-2292.

Adkins Arboretum Announces ‘Native Table’ Raffle

Adkins Arboretum
RIDGELY, MD—May 22, 2016)


Winner will receive exquisite dining experience for 20

Early-afternoon brunch en plein air with fall leaves drifting lazily to the forest floor…a sunset dinner on the wetland overlook set to a serenade of spring peepers…indulgent desserts in the Native Plant Nursery’s lush greenhouse. These delights are what winners of Adkins Arboretum’s Native Table raffles can anticipate.

Beginning this spring, the Arboretum will hold two Native Table raffles annually. Winners will receive a seasonal dining experience for 20 inspired by the Arboretum’s wild edibles. Only 100 tickets will be sold per raffle, with proceeds used to support the Arboretum’s mission of conserving the Chesapeake Bay region’s native landscapes.

The winner of the first Native Table raffle will receive Brunch Under the Branches, a decadent brunch for 20 catered by chef Steve Konopelski of Turnbridge Point Bed & Breakfast. Guests will indulge in offerings inspired by the field and forest, including wild onion frittata, banana and black walnut muffins, sassafras sweet tea, highbush blueberry cobbler, and field greens garnished with wood sorrel in a sumac vinaigrette.

Konopelski is a classically trained pastry chef and couture wedding cake designer who graduated at the top of his class from the prestigious French Culinary Institute. A former Broadway performer, he infuses his creations with passion and artistry. His love of performing and ability to connect with people have made Konopelski a popular teacher whose love of teaching is almost matched by his love of baking. Konopelski and his husband, Rob Griffith, own and operate Turnbridge Point, an upscale bed and breakfast and event venue in Denton.

Brunch Under the Branches will be held under the Arboretum’s new education pavilion on Sun., Sept. 18 from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Ticket sales are underway and will end on Thurs., June 30 or when all 100 tickets are sold. The winner will be selected by a random drawing on Fri., July 1. Tickets may be purchased at adkinsarboretum.org or by calling 410-634-2847, ext. 0. for more information.

Ellie Altman to Receive Conservation Landscaping Award

Chesapeake Conservation Landscaping Council
October 30, 2015

On November 12, 2015, Ellie Altman, recently retired Director of Adkins Arboretum, will become the second recipient of the Marcy Damon Conservation Landscaping Award. The award, given by the Chesapeake Conservation Landscaping Council (CCLC), a regional non-profit, recognizes Altman for her role in the conception of the CCLC, her long time commitment to conservation landscaping and environmental education, and the recent publication of the book “Chesapeake Gardening and Landscaping: The Essential Green Guide”, by Barbara W. Ellis.

The award will be presented by Britt Slattery, the recipient of the previous award who was also instrumental in founding the CCLC. The presentation will take place at the Welcome Dinner preceding CCLC’s 2015 Turning a New Leaf Conference on Friday, November 13, at the Sheraton Baltimore North Hotel in Towson, Maryland. The conference educates professionals on sustainable landscaping and development best practices.

The Marcy Damon Conservation Landscaping Award was created by the CCLC to honor former Council chair and Maryland naturalist and educator, Marcy Damon. Damon passed away in 2013 from acute myeloid leukemia. Damon spent many years contributing passionately to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation’s effort to “Save the Bay,”
and her dedication to sustainable landscaping, habitat preservation, and environmental education was inspirational.

Altman, as Director of the Adkins Arboretum, steered the mission towards educating the public about conservation landscaping, played a role overseeing the First Stop for the Bay campaign, and oversaw the project to create the book “Chesapeake Gardening and Landscaping: The Essential Green Guide”, which took several years from idea to fruition. The book is a comprehensive guide on how to create more eco-friendly landscapes.

CCLC encourages individuals, businesses and organizations to join the non-profit organization. For more information and to register for the dinner and the conference, visit www.chesapeakelandscape.org/new-leaf.

About the Chesapeake Conservation Landscaping Council
CCLC is a coalition of individuals and organizations dedicated to researching, promoting, and educating the public about conservation-based gardening and landscaping practices in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed.

Winter Naturalists Program for Homeschool Students Begins February 2, 2016 at Adkins Arboretum

Adkins Arboretum
(RIDGELY, MD—October 22, 2015)

Homeschool families can beat the winter doldrums by engaging in hands-on science fun at Adkins Arboretum! Science for Homeschool Students: Winter Naturalists is a six-week program that begins February 2, 2016.

In this engaging series, students ages 8 to 12 will join Youth Program Coordinator Jenny Houghton to conduct insulation experiments, construct birdfeeders, visit a fox den, identify food sources for white-tailed deer, and learn how local wildlife adapts to winter weather. They’ll also collect data about winter animal activity in the Arboretum’s meadow, forest, wetland and stream habitats. Winter nature poems and outdoor art are part of the learning experience. Classes meet Tuesdays, Feb. 2 to March 8 from 1 to 2:30 p.m.

The series is $45 for members and $60 for non-members, with a $10 discount offered for siblings. Advance registration is required at adkinsarboretum.org or by calling 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Adkins Arboretum Offers Winter Nature Fun for Preschoolers

Adkins Arboretum
(RIDGELY, MD—October 22, 2015)

Groundhogs, snowflakes, foxes and more! Celebrate winter and engage your young child with nature with Adkins Arboretum’s Acorn Academy Nature Preschool programs. Taught by Youth Program Coordinator Jenny Houghton, this series of six classes for three- to five-year-olds is offered Tuesday mornings beginning February 2, 2016.

Advance registration is required for these popular programs. The fee per class is $5 for members and $7 for non-members. Parents may register their preschoolers for individual programs or for the six-program series.

Programs run from 10 to 11:15 a.m. and include a craft and a snack. Space is limited, so early registration is recommended. For more information or to register, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Programs include:

Groundhogs Galore
Feb. 2

It’s Groundhog Day! Learn about Mr. Groundhog and his predictions for the arrival of spring. We’ll look for Arboretum groundhog homes, make groundhog puppets, and sing a special groundhog song.

Journey of a Snowflake
Feb. 9

Let’s pretend we’re snowflakes journeying through the winter sky! We’ll make a glittery snowflake craft, look for Jack Frost in the forest, and warm up with hot chocolate and the beloved children’s book A Snowy Day.

Mitten Magic
Feb. 16

Do you have a mouse in your mitten? We’ll read Jan Brett’s classic children’s story The Mitten and make mouse mittens to take home. In the forest, we’ll look for signs of animals and find out how they keep warm when mittens aren’t an option.

Antlers Away
Feb. 23

While many animals are hibernating through the winter, deer are out and about! Let’s learn about the white-tailed deer and make casts of deer tracks on a meadow walk. Back in the classroom, we’ll color antler headbands and enjoy animal stories.

Fox Trot
March 1

Where do foxes go when the cold wind blows? In their cozy dens, of course! Follow a winding trail to an Arboretum fox den, sing and dance to the “Fox Trot,” and make pop-up fox finger puppets during this fun-filled class.

Seed Starters
March 8

It’s time to start thinking about your summer garden! Learn how seeds grow and start your own seeds in a nifty egg carton tray. Then visit the Arboretum greenhouse and enjoy a picnic snack.

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Adkins Arboretum Partners with Pickering Creek and Phillips Wharf to Offer Maryland Master Natural Training

Adkins Arboretum
RIDGELY, MD—September 3, 2015)

This fall, Adkins Arboretum will offer Maryland Master Naturalist training in partnership with Pickering Creek Audubon Center and Phillips Wharf Environmental Center. The program, geared toward study of the coastal plain, provides training for volunteers to learn and share knowledge of the natural world in Maryland and engages citizens as stewards of Maryland’s natural ecosystems and resources through science-based education and volunteer service in their communities.

Individuals accepted into Master Naturalist training receive 48 hours of instruction, including hands-on outdoors experience. All classes are taught by experts in the subject. The curriculum includes sessions on Maryland’s natural history, flora and fauna, principles of ecology, human interaction with the landscape, and teaching and interpretation. Following training, participants serve in their communities as University of Maryland Extension volunteers.

Training sessions will be held the third Wednesday of the month from October to July, 2016. The program fee is $250; application deadline is Friday, September 18, 2015. For more information or to apply for the Master Naturalist program, contact Robyn Affron at 410-634-2847, ext. 25 or raffron@adkinsarboretum.org, or visit extension.umd.edu/masternaturalist.

Adkins Arboretum is a 400-acre native garden and preserve at the headwaters of the Tuckahoe Creek in Caroline County. Open year round, the Arboretum offers educational programs for all ages about nature and gardening. For more information about Arboretum programs, visit www.adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Learn about Planting in a Post-Wild World at Adkins Arboretum’s Fifth Annual Symposium Program

Adkins Arboretum
RIDGELY, MD—August 13, 2015

We live in a global city with few wild places remaining. Planting designers have the opportunity and responsibility to return wildness and ecological value to the landscape, but this challenge requires a new form of design that works with natural principles and marries horticulture and ecology. Join Adkins Arboretum’s fifth annual symposium, Planting in a Post-Wild World, to learn how native plants will fit into the future landscape and how design strategies based on plant communities can help your next planting project meet aesthetic and ecological goals.

Speakers for the symposium, offered on Sun., Sept. 27 in partnership with the Garden Club of the Eastern Shore, are Claudia West and Thomas Rainer, co-authors of Planting in a Post-Wild World, forthcoming from Timber Press.

West, a sought-after speaker on plant community-based design and the application of natural color theories to planting design, is ecological sales manager at North Creek Nurseries, a wholesale perennial grower in Landenberg, Penn. She holds a master’s degree in landscape architecture and regional planning from the Technical University of Munich, Germany. Her work is centered on the development of stable, layered planting designs and the desire to make native plants widely acceptable and return them to the American landscape.

Rainer is a registered landscape architect, teacher and writer living in Arlington, Va. He is a passionate advocate for an ecologically expressive design ethic that interprets nature rather than imitating it. He has designed landscapes for the U.S. Capitol grounds, the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial and The New York Botanical Garden, as well as more than 80 gardens from Main to Florida. He teaches planting design at George Washington University and blogs regularly at the award-winning site Grounded Design.

Planting in a Post-Wild World will be held Sun., Sept. 27 at 1 p.m. at the Oxford Community Center, 200 Oxford Road, Oxford, Md. A book signing and light refreshments will follow the program, and native plants will be available for purchase. Proceeds benefit the Garden Club of the Eastern Shore Scholarship Fund and Adkins Arboretum. Tickets are $40 and may be reserved at adkinsarboretum.org or by calling 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Finite and Alive, drawings by Rebecca Clark, on view at Adkins Arboretum

Adkins Arboretum
(RIDGELY, MD—August 3, 2015)

Reception to meet the artist is Saturday, August 15, 2015

Finite and Alive, Rebecca Clark’s show of new drawings, is filled with wonder and curiosity about the natural world coupled with a poignant sense of loss. On view through Oct. 2 at the Adkins Arboretum Visitor’s Center, this Hyattsville artist’s exquisite drawings of birds and animals are remarkable for both their skill and their sensitivity. There will be a reception on Sat., Aug. 15 from 3 to 5 p.m. to meet the artist.

Wings angled and strong against the air rushing past them, beak razor sharp, eye clear and bright, Clark’s “Kestrel 1” is the very image of the speed and unrelenting focus of a bird of prey. It’s rare these days to find an artist who has the technical ability and patience to draw so beautifully. Clark’s attention to detail is scrupulous. Every muscle of the kestrel’s compact body is engaged and every intricately patterned feather precisely angled for swiftness and accuracy.

“I’ve been an artist my whole life and studied art and art history,” Clark said. “But it wasn’t until I took a botanical illustration course at the Corcoran College of Art with Leslie Exton that I really learned how to draw. She taught us very particular techniques, and it opened up a whole new world for me.”

Clark draws primarily in graphite, making full use of the nuances of her pencils, but occasionally, she introduces touches of color to focus on a detail or enrich her subject. In “Worlds without End,” she uses varied hues of red to highlight the subtle relationships and contrasts between the colors of rose hips and the feathers of a pair of cardinals. Borrowing its title from Allen Ginsberg’s desolate lament on the nature of contemporary life, “Howl” is a riveting drawing of a howling coyote with a tiny patch of angry red deep in the shadows of its open mouth.

Luscious and tactile, Clark’s drawings of oyster shells were created especially for this show at Adkins Arboretum and acknowledge its proximity to the Chesapeake Bay. Fascinated by their varied shapes and sizes, she drew the oyster shells’ graceful contours and sketched in their subtle colors with colored pencil, watercolor, pastel and oil pastel.

“The oysters are just so symbolic of my childhood in Annapolis and on the Chesapeake Bay. I collected and drew them way back,” she explained. “I also wanted to draw attention to them because of their dwindling population and their crucial value to the health of the Bay. Plus, I’m so mesmerized by their subtle beauty—the concentric rings and build-up of growth, the irregularities, the vibrant colors and iridescence and the stains from algae and bay residue. They’ve been incredibly fun to make.”

Clark’s oysters, as well as her animals and birds, are drawn absent of any background. Their isolation on the stark white of the paper emphasizes the rich textures and forms of their shells, fur or feathers and the pure sense of aliveness of each one. But curiously, it also creates an eerie feeling of separateness.

No living being can exist without its natural environment. Surrounding these creatures with empty space, Clark creates an underlying tension. The creatures she depicts are imperiled, cut off from the environments that created and sustained them. In doing this, she intimates not only the effects of pollution, habitat loss and climate change on individual species but, even more significantly, the loss of human consciousness of our intimate connections with the delicate balance of life on earth.

This show is part of Adkins Arboretum’s ongoing exhibition series of work on natural themes by regional artists. It is on view through Oct. 2 at the Arboretum Visitor’s Center located at 12610 Eveland Road near Tuckahoe State Park in Ridgely. Contact the Arboretum at 410-634-2847, ext. 0 or info@adkinsarboretum.org for gallery hours.

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Adkins Arboretum is a 400-acre native garden and preserve at the headwaters of the Tuckahoe Creek in Caroline County. Open year round, the Arboretum offers educational programs for all ages about nature and gardening. For additional information about Arboretum programs, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

The Scientific Method for Homeschoolers Begins September 15, 2015 at Adkins Arboretum

Adkins Arboretum
RIDGELY, MD—July 30, 2015

Uncover the fascinating origins of modern science with a glimpse into the past when Adkins Arboretum offers The Scientific Method for Homeschoolers, an eight-week program beginning September 15, 2015.

In this series, homeschool students ages 7 to 14 will journey from the birth of science in ancient Mesopotamia to science in the 21st century, with stops along the way in ancient Greece, the Middle Ages, the Scientific Revolution and The Age of Reason. Delving into the components of the scientific method, students will learn key scientific vocabulary and conduct experiments. They will use their newfound knowledge in the field, working in teams to create and test hypotheses related to the Arboretum’s forest, wetland, meadow and stream habitats. The program will culminate in a science fair showcasing team projects. Reading activities will be part of each class. Classes will meet on Tuesdays from 1 to 2:30 p.m., September 15 to November 3, 2015.

The series is $55 for members and $70 for non-members. Advance registration is required at adkinsarboretum.org or by calling 410-634-2847, ext. 0.